The Sceret of Giraffe’s Skin

With spots resembling oak leaves, in the heat of Southern Africa’s day giraffes are equipped with the means of their own cooling system. The coats main purpose is for camouflage but as useful as their uniquely individual coats are, beneath these patches are veins around them that lets blood flow to the centre where the blood vessels allow heat to be emitted. Whereas most larger animals like buffalo, rhino and elephants would of course wallow in the rivers and waterholes to keep cool, unfortunately giraffes cannot swim and so avoid even walking in water.

These graceful giants can consume up to 38 litres of water a day by putting themselves in a vulnerable head down position while drinking. Therefore, they will either drink while the rest of the journey of giraffes are present for protection or, will get their moisture when feeding on certain food sources. The giraffe gets most of the moisture from the thorny acacia and combretum leaves they eat and so can actually go 2 or 3 days without drinking water. If you ever find yourself in a game reserve be sure to spend a moment with these gentle giants.